Cheating

“In order to carry on its work of teaching, research, and public service, the University has an obligation to maintain conditions under which the work of the University can go forward freely, in accordance with the highest standards of quality, institutional integrity, and freedom of expression, with full recognition by all concerned of the rights and privileges, as well as the responsibilities, of those who compose the University community.

These campus regulations address the rights and responsibilities of members of the University community and provide campus-wide standards for implementing regulations as a means of sustaining this community. Each member of this campus shares the responsibility of maintaining this unique community so that the University's mission of teaching, research, and public service can be achieved.”

- Preamble to the UCSB Campus Regulations


All members of the academic community share responsibility for the academic integrity of the UCSB community. Academic dishonesty is an assault upon the basic integrity and meaning of a University. Cheating, plagiarism, and collusion in dishonest activities are serious acts which erode the University’s educational and research roles and cheapen the learning experience as well as the value of one’s degree. This is true for perpetrators as well as the entire community. It is expected that all UCSB students will support the ideal of academic integrity and that they will be responsible for the integrity of their work. Materials (written or otherwise) submitted to fulfill academic requirements must represent a student’s own efforts unless otherwise permitted by an instructor. It is also the responsibility of each student to know the campus rules regarding academic misconduct—ignorance is no excuse. 

- Judicial Affairs Website


Academic Integrity: A Student's Guide (PDF)
Common Myths about Academic Dishonesty (PDF)
"Avoiding Plagiarism: Mastering the Art of Scholarship" by Student Judicial Affairs, University of California, Davis Retrieved May 1, 2002, from University of California, Davis Website

Click Here To Report Cheating


Alternatively, you may report instances of cheating directly via email at cheating@econ.ucsb.edu